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March 20, 1760: Boston Burns

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Boston Abolitionists Await Emancipation Proclamation: December 31, 1862
On this day, New Year's Eve 1862, William Lloyd Garrison, publisher of the abolitionist paper The Liberator, delayed printing the latest edition...

Site for Cambridge Selected: December 28, 1630
On this day in 1630, the Massachusetts Bay Colony proprietors chose a site along the northern bank of the Charles River for their capital. They named...

Boston Ends Discharge of Sewer Sludge into Harbor: December 24, 1991
On this day in 1991, the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority ended an age-old practice of dumping sewer sludge directly into Boston Harbor. Proponents...

Alice Freeman and George Palmer Marry: December 23, 1887
On this day in 1887, Alice Freeman, charismatic president of Wellesley College, wed Harvard professor George Palmer, to the consternation of many Boston...

State House Celebrates "Return of the Colors": December 22, 1865
On this day in 1865, Governor John Andrew officially received the battered regimental colors of Massachusetts units of the Union Army in a solemn State...

Aerosmith Opens Lansdowne Street Music Hall: December 19, 1994
On this day in 1994, Boston-based rock band Aerosmith opened the Mama Kin Music Hall. In the shadow of Fenway Park, the Lansdowne Street facility enjoyed...

Architect Charles Bulfinch Obtains Mortgage: December 18, 1794
On this day in 1794, Boston architect Charles Bulfinch obtained a mortgage for the house he had recently designed and built for his family. The 31-year-old...

First YMCA in the United States Organized in Boston: December 15, 1851
On this day in 1851, a group of evangelicals from several Boston churches founded the first Young Men's Christian Association in the United States....

Henrietta Leavitt Buried in Cambridge: December 14, 1921
On this day in 1921, Henrietta Leavitt, a scientist at the Harvard Observatory, was buried in Cambridge. Her premature death cut short a brilliant career...

Crowd Gathers to Hear Writer Mary Antin: December 8, 1912
On this day in 1912, over 1,000 people gathered at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York to hear Boston writer Mary Antin. She had come to make a plea...

"Good Will Hunting" Released: December 5, 1997
On this day in 1997, Miramax released "Good Will Hunting," a movie about the collision of two Boston-area cultures: the heady, prestigious...

African Meeting House Opens: December 4, 1806
On this day in 1806, the Reverend Thomas Paul was installed as pastor of the new African Meeting House in Boston. Two days later, the church was officially...

Charles Dickens Begins Second American Tour: December 2, 1867
On this day in 1867, Charles Dickens began his second American reading tour at Boston's Tremont Temple. An enthusiastic audience, which included...

Boston Tea Party Raider Born: November 17, 1738
On this day in 1736, David Kinnison was born in Old Kingston, Maine. An early convert to the cause of American independence, he participated in the dumping...

Quincy's Granite Industry Begins: November 16, 1825
On this day in 1825, a Boston newspaper carried a notice seeking 9,000 tons of "the best Quincy granite" for the Bunker Hill Monument....

King Gillette Patents Safety Razor: November 15, 1904
On this day in 1904, Boston-based inventor King Camp Gillette received a patent for an improved safety razor with a disposable blade. After almost 10...

Evangelist Billy Sunday Draws 70,000 to Boston Revival: November 12, 1916
On this day in 1916, 55,000 people came to hear Billy Sunday preach in Boston. An overflow crowd of 15,000 had to be turned away from the temporary tabernacle...

Great Fire Devastates Boston: November 9, 1872
On this day in 1872, a monstrous fire nearly destroyed Boston's business district, ravaging the city from the Common to the waterfront. Beginning...

Islamic Society Breaks Ground in Roxbury: November 7, 2002
...in 2002, the Islamic Society of Boston held a ceremonial groundbreaking in Roxbury for New England's largest mosque and Islamic cultural center....

Boston's "Honey Fitz" Fitzgerald Elected to Congress: November 6, 1895
On this day in 1895, a colorful Irishman from Boston's North End, nicknamed "Honey Fitz" for his charming and loquacious ways,...

Mayor Curley Jeopardizes Election: November 3, 1929
On this day in 1929, James Michael Curley, heavily favored to win his third term as mayor of Boston, used a radio appearance to defame a school committee...

Boston Celebrates Opening of Aqueduct: October 25, 1848
On this day in 1848, 300,000 people from all over New England gathered on Boston Common. They came to celebrate the completion of the city's first...

Boston Dentist Demonstrates Ether: October 16, 1846
On this day in 1846, a crowd gathered in the operating theater at Massachusetts General Hospital. A Boston printer with a tumor on his jaw lay on the...

Boston Doctors Use First Iron Lung: October 12, 1928
On this day in 1928, Children's Hospital in Boston was the scene of the first use of an "iron lung." Developed by a young Harvard...

Utopians Purchase Brook Farm: October 11, 1841
On this day in 1841, a group of Boston-area utopians purchased Brook Farm in West Roxbury. The writer Nathaniel Hawthorne spent six months there and later...

Balloonist Takes First Aerial Photograph: October 8, 1860
On this day in 1860, Boston newspapers carried an advertisement for an extraordinary event: photographer James Wallace Black would photograph Boston from...

Ted Williams Bats for the Last Time: September 28, 1960
On this day in 1960, Ted Williams thrilled the fans at Fenway by hitting a dramatic homer at his last at-bat in his 21-year career with the Boston Red...

Boston Garden Hosts Final Game: September 26, 1995
On this day in 1995, the Bruins played the final game at the Boston Garden. For almost 70 years, the cavernous building served as the city's main...

First Newspaper Published in the Colonies: September 25, 1690
On this day in 1690, Boston printer Benjamin Harris produced the first issue of Publick Occurrences, the first newspaper published in Britain's North...

Paul Revere Statue Unveiled: September 22, 1940
On this day in 1940, a bronze statue of Paul Revere was unveiled in the shadow of the Old North Church. In the crowd of 8,000, stood the sculptor —...

Brookline Amateur Wins U.S. Open: September 19, 1913
On this day in 1913, at The Country Club in Brookline, 20-year-old Francis Ouimet became the first amateur to win the U.S. Open Golf Tournament. Growing...

Boston Celebrates 250th Birthday: September 17, 1880
On this day in 1880 Boston celebrated its 250th birthday. For three and a half hours during the day, a column of 14,500 people marched four and a half...

Boston Lighthouse Lit for the First Time: September 14, 1716
On this day in 1716, Boston Light on Little Brewster Island was lit for the first time. The first lighthouse built in North America, the structure weathered...

Polaroid Wins Patent Suit Against Kodak: September 13, 1985
On this day in 1985, Polaroid won a huge victory in federal court. A judge ruled that Kodak had violated Polaroid's patents for instant photography....

Hasty Pudding Club Forms at Harvard: September 8, 1795
On this day in 1795, 21 Harvard students gathered in a dorm room and formed a secret social club to cultivate "friendship and patriotism."...

Boston Public Library Receives $1 Million Donation: September 5, 1947
On this day in 1947, self-made millionaire John Deferrari donated over $1,000,000 to the Boston Public Library to express his gratitude to the institution...

Massachusetts General Hospital Admits First Patient: September 3, 1821
On this day in 1821, the Massachusetts General Hospital admitted its first patient, a 30-year-old sailor. More than a decade earlier, two Boston doctors...

Nation's First Subway Opens in Boston: September 1, 1897
On this day in 1897, at 6 am, over 100 people crowded onto the first train to travel through a tunnel under downtown Boston. More than 100,000 people...

Brandeis University Receives Phi Beta Kappa Charter: August 30, 1961
On this day in 1961, Brandeis University received good news. Less than a decade after accepting its first students, the school had been given approval...

Quincy's Market Opens: August 26, 1826
On this day in 1826, Boston celebrated the grand opening of the Faneuil Hall, commonly known as Quincy Marketplace. Located on the site that had long...

Route 128 Opens Boston's High Tech Age: August 24, 1951
On this day in 1951, the first segment of Route 128 was opened. By 1956, the expressway stretched 65 miles from Gloucester to Braintree. While officials...

Massachusetts Executes Sacco and Vanzetti: August 23, 1927
On this day in 1927, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were put to death in the state prison in Charlestown. A jury convicted them of murder and robbery...

Dr. Susan Dimock Begins Medical Residency: August 20, 1872
On this day in 1872, Dr. Susan Dimock became the resident physician at the New England Hospital for Women and Children in Boston. Only a month earlier,...

Boston Police Vote to Unionize, Precipitating Riots: August 15, 1919
On this day in 1919, Boston policemen seeking better wages and working conditions voted to form a union. The Commissioner of Police forbid them to unionize....

Boston Mob Protests Stamp Act: August 14, 1765
On this day in 1765, the British official charged with administering the hated Stamp Act was hung in effigy from an elm tree near Boston Common. A small...

Charlestown Convent Lies in Ruins: August 12, 1834
On this day in 1834, the Ursuline Convent in Charlestown lay in ruins. The night before, a Protestant mob sacked it and burned it to the ground. The nuns...

Boston Doctors Appeal for Mental Hospital: August 10, 1810
On August 20, 1810, two Boston doctors circulated an appeal for "a hospital for the reception of lunatics and other sick persons." (Some...

Central Artery Project Announced: August 8, 1954
On this day in 1954, The Boston Globe announced the opening of the first elevated expressway in the United States. Hailed as an engineering marvel and...

Free Love Supporters Protest at Faneuil Hall: August 1, 1878
On this day in 1878, several thousand supporters of Ezra Heywood held an "Indignation Meeting" at Boston's Faneuil Hall. They were...

Boston Masons Organize First Grand Lodge in America: July 30, 1733
On this day in 1733, 18 men gathered at the Bunch of Grapes Tavern on King Street in Boston and organized the first Masonic Lodge in North America. The...

Henry David Thoreau Spends Night in Jail: July 23, 1846
On this day in 1846, Henry David Thoreau left his cabin at Walden Pond for a brief walk into town and ended up in the Concord jail for refusing to pay...

Hemingway Room Dedicated at JFK Library: July 18, 1980
On this day in 1980, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and Ernest Hemingway's son Patrick dedicated the Hemingway Room at the recently opened John F. Kennedy...

Quincy Shipyard Launches First Nuclear Powered Cruiser: July 14, 1959
On this day in 1959, the nation's first nuclear-powered cruiser was launched from Fore River Shipyard in Quincy. With its deep and sheltered harbor,...

Revere Beach Opens: July 12, 1896
On this day in 1896, 45,000 people gathered in Revere to celebrate the opening of the first public beach in the nation. In 1895 the newly-created Metropolitan...

America's First Black Poet Purchased as a Slave: July 11, 1761
On this day in 1761, John Wheatley, a successful merchant, purchased a frail little black girl off a slave ship in Boston. The Wheatleys named her Phillis,...

Anti-war Activists Sentenced to Prison: July 10, 1968
On this day in 1968, four men were sentenced to federal prison for counseling young men to refuse military service. Dubbed the Boston Five, the defendants...

Weepin' Willie Robinson Born: July 6, 1926
On this day in 1926, "Boston's Elder Statesman of the Blues," Weepin' Willie Robinson, was born. Raised in the South, he launched...

Patent Office Rules in Favor of Elias Howe: July 1, 1854
On this day in 1854, the battle ended over who owned the patent for the first sewing machine. A federal commission ruled that the patent held by Elias...

David Walker Found Dead: June 28, 1830
On this day in 1830, David Walker, a prominent and outspoken black man, was found dead in his Boston home. The year before he had written David Walker's...

Otis House Moved: June 27, 1925
On this day in 1925, workmen finished moving an historic Beacon Hill residence back from the brink of destruction. Cambridge Street was slated to be turned...

Dr. Boylston Experiments with Smallpox Inoculation: June 26, 1721
On this day in 1721, Boston doctor Zabdiel Boylston took a gamble with his young son's life and inoculated him against smallpox. Puritan minister...

Last Elevated Train Runs in Boston: June 25, 2004
On this day in 2004, Boston's last elevated train pulled into North Station. For over a century, Bostonians had avoided the congested streets below...

Legislature Allows Establishment of Mount Auburn Cemetery: June 23, 1831
On this day in 1831, the legislature granted the Massachusetts Horticultural Society permission to purchase land for use as an experimental garden and...

Governor Honors Activist Melnea Cass: June 19, 1968
On this day in 1968, Governor John Volpe dedicated the Melnea Cass Swimming and Skating Rink in Roxbury. The new facility was intended to improve life...

Bostonians Lay Cornerstone for Bunker Hill Monument: June 17, 1825
On this day in 1825, at the laying of the cornerstone of the Bunker Hill Monument, Daniel Webster addressed a crowd of 100,000, including 190 veterans...

Police Find First Victim of "Boston Strangler": June 14, 1962
On this day in 1962, police discovered the body of the first victim of the "Boston Strangler." For the next two years, Boston would...

Ground Broken for Symphony Hall: June 12, 1899
On this day in 1899, ground was broken for Boston's Symphony Hall. From the day it was completed a year and a half later, the building would be considered...

Firemen and Irish Clash in Boston Riot: June 11, 1837
On this day in 1837, an Irish funeral procession and a company of Yankee volunteer firefighters came face-to-face in the streets of Boston. Over the next...

Children's Cancer Research Foundation Incorporated: June 8, 1951
On this day in 1951 the Children's Cancer Research Foundation was incorporated. Founded by pioneering Boston physician Sidney Farber, it was the...

Ellen Swallow Marries Robert Richards: June 4, 1875
On this day in 1875, Ellen Swallow married M.I.T. Professor Robert Hallowell Richards. Three days later, they set off on a wedding trip to Nova Scotia...

Massachusetts Creates Nation's First Regional Park System: June 3, 1893
On this day in 1893, Governor William Eustis Russell signed a bill creating the Metropolitan Parks Commission, the nation's first regional park system....

Alcott Family Arrives at Fruitlands: June 1, 1843
On this day in 1843, a group of three adults and five children made its way from Concord to the town of Harvard. Their destination was an old and dilapidated...

Vietnam Veterans Arrested on Lexington Green: May 30, 1971
On this day in 1971, over 450 anti-war protesters occupied the historic Lexington Green and refused to leave. The Vietnam Veterans Against the War had...

Fugitive Slave Anthony Burns Arrested: May 24, 1854
On this day in 1854, Anthony Burns, a fugitive slave from Virginia, was arrested in Boston. His capture enraged black and white abolitionists. Two days...

Final Episode of "Cheers" Airs: May 20, 1993
On this day in 1993, the sitcom "Cheers" aired its 275th and final episode. One of the most popular shows in television history, "Cheers"...

Boston's Poor Riot Over Cost of Bread: May 19, 1713
On this day in 1713, more than 200 people rioted on Boston Common over the high price of bread. The lieutenant governor tried to intervene but was shot...

Thousands Walk Across Zakim-Bunker Hill Bridge: May 12, 2002
On this day in 2002, more than 200,000 people celebrated Mother's Day by walking across the Leonard P. Zakim-Bunker Hill Bridge, months before it...

Globe Publishes First "Confidential Chat": May 11, 1884
On this day in 1884, The Boston Globe published the first "Housekeepers Column," known since 1922 as "Confidential Chat."...

Critic Declares Springsteen Future of Rock and Roll: May 9, 1974
On this day in 1974, 25-year-old Bruce Springsteen played at the Harvard Square Theater in Cambridge. Although popular with the college crowd in the Northeast,...

Ceremony Honors Early Indian Students: May 3, 1997
On this day in 1997, over 300 people gathered in Harvard Yard to commemorate a long forgotten part of the college's history. A plaque was unveiled...

Composer Stravinsky Visits Gropius House in Lincoln: May 2, 1940
On this day in 1940, the German-born architect Walter Gropius and his wife Ise opened their new home in Lincoln to some old friends — the great...

Boston Jews Petition for First Cemetery: April 29, 1844
On this day in 1844, members of Boston's first Jewish congregation petitioned city officials to set aside a corner of an East Boston cemetery for...

Celtics Coach Red Auerbach Retires: April 28, 1966
On this day in 1966, Red Auerbach retired as head coach of the Boston Celtics after leading the team to 11 championships in 16 years. The Brooklyn native...

Activists Erect "Tent City" in Boston: April 27, 1968
On this day in 1968, hundreds of demonstrators occupied a parking lot in Boston's South End. Houses on the site had recently been demolished, and...

"The Birth of a Nation" Sparks Protest: April 26, 1915
On this day in 1915 Boston's African-American community protested the showing of the racist film The Birth of a Nation. When 800 black women gathered...

Poet Anne Sexton Publishes First Book: April 22, 1960
On this day in 1960, Massachusetts poet Anne Sexton had her first collection of poems published, To Bedlam and Part Way Back. Just before the manuscript...

Rosie Ruiz Steals Boston Marathon: April 21, 1980
On this day in 1980 Rosie Ruiz tried to steal the Boston Marathon. Crowned the women's champion when she crossed the finish line, Ruiz looked surprisingly...

Battle Begins on Lexington Common: April 19, 1775
On this day in 1775, the first shots were fired in the cause of American independence. In Ralph Waldo Emerson's famous poem, "the shot heard...

Tip O’Neill Announces Run for Congress: April 16, 1952
On this day in 1952, Thomas P. ("Tip") O'Neill of Cambridge announced that he would run for the Congressional seat being vacated...

"John Howe" Spies on Concord — or Not: April 11, 1775
On this day in 1775, John Howe arrived in Concord to spy for British General Gage. He quickly gained the trust of the town's leading patriots. They...

Harvard Students Occupy University Hall: April 9, 1969
On this day in 1969, Harvard students took over University Hall, one of the college's oldest buildings. Opposed to the escalating war in Vietnam,...

Reading Launches Favorite Poem Project: April 8, 1998
On this day in 1998, 25 Bostonians, including the president of the Massachusetts Senate, a homeless man, and a fifth grade student, recited their favorite...

H.L. Mencken Arrested in Boston: April 5, 1926
On this day in 1926, reporter and literary critic H.L. Mencken was arrested on Boston Common for selling a magazine that had been banned by the New England...

Boston Mourns Martin Luther King, Jr.: April 4, 1968
On this day in 1968, Boston crackled with tension. African Americans, enraged by the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. in Memphis, took to the...

Boston Minister Tried for Inciting a Riot: April 3, 1855
On this day in 1855, the case against Boston minister Theodore Parker came to trial. Charged with inciting an abolitionist riot, he defended himself by...

Benjamin Franklin Introduces "Silence Dogood": April 2, 1722
On this day in 1722, the Boston paper The Courant first published a letter from a widow with a keen wit and a gift for satire. Every few weeks, another...

Concord Women Cast First Votes: March 29, 1880
On this day in 1880, Louisa May Alcott and 19 other women attended the Concord Town Meeting. The year before, the Massachusetts legislature had made it...

Dorothea Dix Begins Her Crusade: March 28, 1841
On this day in 1841, Dorothea Dix visited an East Cambridge jail and was appalled to see mentally ill women confined alongside hardened criminals. The...

Jordan Marsh Announces New Store: March 27, 1947
On this day in 1947, Jordan, Marsh and Company announced that it was going to build "the greatest department store in the world" in...

Anne Hutchinson Banished: March 22, 1638
On this day in 1638, Anne Hutchinson was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Three years after arriving in Boston, she found herself the first...

Boston Burns: March 20, 1760
On this day in 1760, the dreaded cry of "Fire!" roused sleeping Bostonians. Over the next ten hours, the worst fire to strike a colonial...

Professor's Murder Trial Begins: March 19, 1850
On this day in 1850, a sensational murder trial began in Boston. Both the victim and the accused belonged to the city's social elite. The case had...

Boston Celebrates First Evacuation Day: March 17, 1901
On this day in 1901, the City of Boston officially celebrated Evacuation Day for the first time. In early March of 1776, Continental troops managed to...

John Brown Speaks in Concord: March 12, 1857
On this day in 1857, John Brown addressed a crowd in Concord Town Hall. He spoke about the situation in Kansas, where a bitter struggle was underway between...

Five Die in Boston Massacre: March 5, 1770
On this day in 1770, Crispus Attucks, a black man from Framingham, and four other civilians were shot dead by British soldiers. Attucks worked on whaling...

Globe Publishes First Edition: March 4, 1872
On this day in 1872, a brand-new newspaper hit the streets of Boston. Costing four cents, the Globe had twice the number of pages as most competitors...

Ruiz Wins World Heavyweight Championship: March 3, 2001
On this day in 2001, boxer Johnny Ruiz of Chelsea defeated Evander Holyfield in 12 rounds to become the first-ever Latino WBA heavyweight champion. Trained...

Perkins School for the Blind Incorporated: March 2, 1829
On this day in 1829, the New England Asylum for the Blind was incorporated in Boston. Begun with six students, within six years, the institution had ten...

Bedford Responds to "Boston Pamphlet": March 1, 1773
On this day in 1773, the town of Bedford held its annual meeting. Along with the routine matters to be addressed, there was one unusual item of business....

Malcolm X Imprisoned: February 27, 1946
On this day in 1946, 20-year-old Malcolm Little entered the state prison in Charlestown to begin serving a sentence for burglary. While in jail, he joined...

William Dawes Dies: February 25, 1799
On this day in 1799, William Dawes died. The first man to be dispatched on the night of April 18, 1775, Dawes carried the same message as Paul Revere,...

Gardner Museum Opens: February 23, 1903
On this day in 1903, Isabella Stewart Gardner's newly completed home and museum was opened to the public for the first time. The grand building on...

Bostonians Respond to Irish Famine: February 18, 1847
On this day in 1847, Boston's leading citizens held a meeting at Fanueil Hall in response to news of the famine devastating Ireland. With the failure...

First Esperanto Society Formed: February 16, 1905
On this day in 1905, the first Esperanto Society in the United States was established in Boston. Invented by a Polish doctor in the 1880s, Esperanto was...

Shadrach Minkins Seized: February 15, 1851
On this day in 1851, a group of outraged black men burst into a courtroom in Boston and rescued Shadrach Minkins, the first escaped slave seized in New...

Boston Holds First "Rat Day": February 13, 1917
On this day in 1917, the Boston Women's Municipal League held the first — and as it happened, only — Rat Day. Increasing numbers...

Lewis Latimer Awarded First Patent: February 10, 1874
On this day in 1874, inventor Lewis Latimer received his first patent. The son of a Virginia couple who had escaped from slavery, he was born and raised...

Activist Florence Luscomb Born: February 6, 1887
On this day in 1887, lifelong political activist Florence Luscomb was born in Lowell. As a child, she heard the legendary Susan B. Anthony speak. In her...

Boston Celtics Retire Larry Bird's Number: February 4, 1993
On this day in 1993, there was standing room only in the Boston Garden as the Celtics retired Larry Bird's number. In his 13 seasons with Boston,...

Tenley Albright Wins Olympic Gold: February 3, 1956
On this day in 1956, figure skater Tenley Albright won the Gold Medal at the Olympic Games in Cortina, Italy. This should not have been a surprise but...

Abigail Adams Knows: February 2, 1775
On this day in 1775, Abigail Adams wrote sadly "the Die is Cast . . . The Sword is now our only yet dreadful alternative." The day before,...

First African American Graduate of Harvard Born: January 30, 1844
On this day in 1844, Richard Greener, the first African-American graduate of Harvard, was born. His unusual education was made possible by several wealthy...

Julia Ward Howe Elected to American Academy of Arts: January 28, 1908
On this day in 1908, 89-year-old Julia Ward Howe became the first woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Howe lived most of her long...

Henry Knox Brings Cannon to Boston: January 24, 1776
On this day in 1776, Colonel Henry Knox reached the headquarters of the Continental Army in Cambridge. The young Boston bookseller had pulled off a daring...

First Legal Sea Foods Lost to Fire: January 16, 1980
On this day in 1980, fire destroyed the original Legal Sea Foods fish market and restaurant in Cambridge. The restaurant re-opened, but the business soon...

Great Molasses Flood: January 15, 1919
On this day in 1919, people in Boston's North End were startled by a loud rumbling noise. They watched in horror as a five-story tank broke apart,...

Nation's First Country Club Established: January 14, 1882
On this day in 1882, a group of men from the social elite of Boston formally established The Country Club of Brookline, the first such club in the United...

The 'Sacred' Cod Moves to the New State House: January 11, 1798
On this day in 1798, the Massachusetts legislature paraded solemnly from the Old State House to its quarters in a new building at the top of Beacon Hill....

Boston Swears in First Irish-born Mayor: January 5, 1885
On this day in 1885, Hugh O'Brien, the first Irish immigrant elected mayor of Boston, took the oath of office. A new era was beginning. For several...

Isaac Asimov Born: January 2, 1920
On this day in 1920, Isaac Asimov was born. He grew up in New York, but it was during his two decades in Boston that he made his name as a master of science...

Brownies Take a Winter Swim: January 1, 1904
On this day in 1904, the L Street Brownies held their first New Year's Day swim in Boston Harbor. Every year since then, a crowd of swimmers and...

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